Global Health Summit 2008

Main Contents
Follow-Up Meeting in Tokyo

organizer
supporter
  • Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  • Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare
  • Ministry of Finance

Discussion Points

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Government

“In the Toyako G8 process, Japan invested substantial effort to implement a participatory approach across stakeholders, which enabled all of us to discuss at length, think deeply, ensure accountability, and craft a high quality Toyako framework for action. We would like to carry on this participatory approach and convey our learnings to Italy.”
Shinsuke Sugiyama
Deputy Director-General, International Bureau, Ministry of Finance, Japan

Shinsuke Sugiyama

 

Government

“The achievement of the Toyako G8 Summit needs to be widely confirmed, developed to a higher level, and built into future discussions. We will encourage WHO, in their upcoming meetings, to transform the initiatives from G8 into global actions.
Taro Muraki
Assistant Minister, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan

Taro Muraki

 

Business

“Sumitomo Chemical manufactures Olyset Net insecticidal bed nets in Tanzania and supplies the nets in Africa for malaria control. We are planning to further expand the operations in Africa. Through the business, we contribute to the improvement of Africa’s public health and the development of local economy. The private sector has huge potential to help Africa. In order to realize the potential, the private sector and the public sector must make concerted efforts to support Africa’s capacity building, especially in the areas of infrastructure and human resource development.”
Hiromasa Yonekura
President, Sumitomo Chemical Co., Ltd.
Chairman, Board of Councillors, Nippon Keidanren (Japan Business Federation)

Hiromasa Yonekura

 

Academia

“Academies must help address global issues from a scientific aspect. In 2008, the science academies of G8+5 were able to coordinate and issue a joint statement on Global Health, which had an impact on policymakers in each country. It was the first joint statement that addressed global health as a topic in itself, and was delivered to all G8+5 heads of state.”
Ichiro Kanazawa
President, Science Council of Japan

Ichiro Kanazawa

 

NGOs

“It’s important for NGOs to be coordinated and to speak with one credible and legitimate voice. The NGOs in Japan created the G8 NGO Forum which had a taskforce dedicated to global health. Through this process of collaboration and focus, Japanese NGOs have strengthened both their capability and activities, which will be effective when we pass on our findings to Italy.”
Sumie Ishii
Executive Director, JOICFP
A leader of 2008 G8 NGO Forum, Japan

Sumie Ishii

 

Media

“Media can commit to global health issues by broadcasting to the Japanese public the many great activities of various Japanese stakeholders. Doing so repeatedly, we can gradually raise recognition of global health among citizens. The key is to find a Japanese angle that resonates, and this is true for Italy as well.”
Aiko Doden
Senior News Commentator, Japan Broadcasting Corporation (NHK)

Aiko Doden

 

Civil Society

“Three key factors can be identified in Japan's successful G8 process: Leadership, Dialogue, and a Milestone approach, which enabled us to share our activities with the opinion leaders in the world and repeatedly helped us to improve them. Through our work to highlight on the health system strengthening, we built up a network with global players, and we intend to pass on the message to Italy. The message of health system strengthening, focusing on using available opportunities to improve the quality of aid and on empowering country capacity, will be more and more important in 2009 as the world heads into recession.”
Masamine Jimba
Professor, University of Tokyo
Takemi Taskforce, Japan Center for International Exchange

Masamine Jimba

 

Specific initiatives

““Table for Two is a Japanese initiative stemming out of Davos that seeks to combat both hunger and obesity in this world. Last year, we garnered 100 participating institutions to serve healthy meals, and in the process collected donations for 640,000 school meals in Africa. We need to enhance such initiatives that engage the general public on global health through day-to-day activities. We are expanding our activities both in Japan and abroad in the U.S. and Europe.”
Motohisa Furukawa
Co-Chair of TABLE FOR TWO*, Member, House of Representatives

Motohisa Furukawa

 

*TABLE FOR TWO was launched by Japanese members of The Forum of Young Global Leaders. Company cafeterias that participate serve healthy meal options, with the company donating 20 cents to TABLE FOR TWO for each healthy meal served. Using these donations, school meals are then provided at participating schools in developing countries at a cost of just 20 cents per meal.

Specific activity

“Noguchi is a well-known to the Japanese public, and former Prime Minister Koizumi was truly the champion to create and publicize this Prize. The presentation ceremony was held by Prime Minister Yasuo Fukuda, and attended by their Majesties the Emperor and Empress of Japan and 40 heads of state and government from African countries. We succeeded in making this prize renowned throughout Africa. We’re now preparing for a symposium to commemorate the Hideyo Noguchi Africa Prize in February 2010 in Ghana. Former PM Koizumi has already committed to joining the symposium.”
Yoshimasa Tominaga
Director of Hideyo Noguchi Africa Prize** Unit, Cabinet Office

Yoshimasa Tominaga

 

**The Hideyo Noguchi Africa Prize is an initiative launched by former Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi with the aim of honoring the outstanding achievements of individuals in the fields of medical research and medical services to combat diseases in Africa. It will be awarded every five years to coincide with TICAD.

Health Policy Institute, Japan; Host

“It is clear that all the stakeholders enhanced their commitment to global health in 2008. Not only were there individual highlights such as malaria bed nets, but also initiatives by the government, academies, and NGOs to craft a pan-G8 message on global health. Working with each of the stakeholders, we will put together the experiences and learnings from Japan, and make sure that they contribute to the Italian process, as well as continued momentum building in Japan.”
James Kondo
President, Health Policy Institute, Japan

James Kondo

 
“Japan has to communicate to the world its cross-stakeholder initiatives, and public-private partnerships that led to global health remaining on the G8 agenda in 2008. As we face a new world in 2009, with a new US President, actions on economic slow-down, opportunities in green technology, agriculture and food continuing to be structural issues particularly in Japan, we need to take a broader global perspective as we think about how our activities fit into the broader picture.”
Kiyoshi Kurokawa
Chairman, Health Policy Institute, Japan

Kiyoshi Kurokawa

 

Summary

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